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THE HIGHWAY CODE
Alterations to The Highway Code (Introduction and rules 1, 5, 8, 13, 19, 52, 59, 61, 62,
63, 66, 67, 69, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 125, 140, 144, 151, 160, 163,
167, 170, 178, 183, 186, 187, 192, 195, 199, 204, 206, 211, 212, 213, 215, 239, Annex 1 and
Annex 6) proposed to be made by the Secretary of State for Transport and laid before
both Houses of Parliament on 01 December 2021 pursuant to section 38 of the Road
Traffic Act 1988.
Enclosed is a complete copy of The Highway Code. The alterations being proposed to The
Highway Code can be found in the Introduction and at rules 1, 5, 8, 13, 19, 52, 59, 61, 62, 63,
66, 67, 69, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 125, 140, 144, 151, 160, 163, 167,
170, 178, 183, 186, 187, 192, 195, 199, 204, 206, 211, 212, 213, 215, 239, Annex 1 and
Annex 6.
The alterations are also set out in the attached table and the reasons for making the proposed
alterations to The Highway Code can be found within the accompanying Explanatory
Memorandum.
In accordance with section 38(3) of the Road Traffic Act 1988, where the Secretary of State
proposes to revise The Highway Code by making any alterations in the provisions of The
Highway Code (other than alteration merely consequential on the passing, amendment or repeal
of any statutory provision) he must lay the proposed alterations before both Houses of
Parliament and must not make the proposed revision until after the end of a period of forty days
beginning with the day on which the alterations were so laid.
Electronic copies of the Government Response to the consultation on a ‘Review of The
Highway Code to improve road safety for cyclists, pedestrians and horse riders’ can be found
online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/review-of-the-highway-code-toimprove-road-safety-for-cyclists-pedestrians-and-horse-riders
Please note that due to coronavirus and remote working for the foreseeable future, we cannot
provide hard copies of the Government Response, but please let us know if you require an
alternative format by contacting the Department for Transport at
HighwayCodeReview2020@dft.gov.uk or in writing, addressed to the Department for
Transport, Great Minster House, 33 Horseferry Road, London SW1P 4DR.
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Amended Text to the Introduction of The Highway Code and rules 1, 5, 8, 13, 19, 52, 59,
61, 62, 63, 66, 67, 69, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 125, 140, 144, 151, 160,
163, 167, 170, 178, 183, 186, 187, 192, 195, 199, 204, 206, 211, 212, 213, 215, 239, Annex 1
and Annex 6
(new, additional or amended text to the Rules has been italicised in bold)
Introduction
This Highway Code applies to England, Scotland and Wales. The Highway Code is essential
reading for everyone.
The aim of The Highway Code is to promote safety on the road, whilst also supporting a
healthy, sustainable and efficient transport system.
Many of the rules in the Code are legal requirements, and if you disobey these rules you are
committing a criminal offence. You may be fined, given penalty points on your licence or be
disqualified from driving. In the most serious cases you may be sent to prison. Such rules are
identified by the use of the words ‘MUST/MUST NOT’. In addition, the rule includes an
abbreviated reference to the legislation which creates the offence. See an explanation of the
abbreviations.
Although failure to comply with the other rules of the Code will not, in itself, cause a person
to be prosecuted, The Highway Code may be used in evidence in any court proceedings under
the Traffic Acts (see The road user and the law) to establish liability. This includes rules
which use advisory wording such as ‘should/should not’ or ‘do/do not’.
Knowing and applying the rules contained in The Highway Code could significantly reduce
road casualties. Cutting the number of deaths and injuries that occur on our roads every day is
a responsibility we all share. The Highway Code can help us discharge that responsibility.
Further information on driving/riding techniques can be found in ‘The Official DVSA Guide
to Driving – the essential skills’ and ‘The Official DVSA Guide to Riding – the essential
skills’.
Hierarchy of Road Users
The ‘Hierarchy of Road Users’ is a concept that places those road users most at risk in the
event of a collision at the top of the hierarchy. The hierarchy does not remove the need for
everyone to behave responsibly. The road users most likely to be injured in the event of a
collision are pedestrians, cyclists, horse riders and motorcyclists, with children, older
adults and disabled people being more at risk. The following H rules clarify this concept.
Rule H1
It is important that ALL road users are aware of The Highway Code, are considerate to
other road users and understand their responsibility for the safety of others.
Everyone suffers when road collisions occur, whether they are physically injured or not.
But those in charge of vehicles that can cause the greatest harm in the event of a collision
bear the greatest responsibility to take care and reduce the danger they pose to others. This
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principle applies most strongly to drivers of large goods and passenger vehicles,
vans/minibuses, cars/taxis and motorcycles.
Cyclists, horse riders and drivers of horse drawn vehicles likewise have a responsibility to
reduce danger to pedestrians.
None of this detracts from the responsibility of ALL road users, including pedestrians,
cyclists and horse riders, to have regard for their own and other road users’ safety.
Always remember that the people you encounter may have impaired sight, hearing or
mobility and that this may not be obvious.
Rule H2
Rule for drivers, motorcyclists, horse drawn vehicles, horse riders and cyclists
At a junction you should give way to pedestrians crossing or waiting to cross a road into
which or from which you are turning.
You MUST give way to pedestrians on a zebra crossing, and to pedestrians and cyclists on
a parallel crossing (see Rule 195).
Pedestrians have priority when on a zebra crossing, on a parallel crossing or at light
controlled crossings when they have a green signal.
You should give way to pedestrians waiting to cross a zebra crossing, and to pedestrians
and cyclists waiting to cross a parallel crossing.
Horse riders should also give way to pedestrians on a zebra crossing, and to pedestrians
and cyclists on a parallel crossing.
Cyclists should give way to pedestrians on shared use cycle tracks and to horse riders on
bridleways.
Only pedestrians may use the pavement. Pedestrians include wheelchair and mobility
scooter users.
Pedestrians may use any part of the road and use cycle tracks as well as the pavement,
unless there are signs prohibiting pedestrians.
Laws TSRGD Schedule 14 part 1 and part 5 & HA 1835 sect 72, R(S)A 1984, sect 129 &
Countryside Act 1968 Sect 1 part 30
Rule H3
Rule for drivers and motorcyclists
You should not cut across cyclists, horse riders or horse drawn vehicles going ahead when
you are turning into or out of a junction or changing direction or lane, just as you would
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not turn across the path of another motor vehicle. This applies whether they are using a
cycle lane, a cycle track, or riding ahead on the road and you should give way to them.
Do not turn at a junction if to do so would cause the cyclist, horse rider or horse drawn
vehicle going straight ahead to stop or swerve.
You should stop and wait for a safe gap in the flow of cyclists if necessary. This includes
when cyclists are:
• approaching, passing or moving off from a junction
• moving past or waiting alongside stationary or slow-moving traffic
• travelling around a roundabout
Rules for pedestrians
Rule 1
Pavements and footways (including any path along the side of a road) should be used if
provided. Where possible, avoid being next to the kerb with your back to the traffic. If you
have to step into the road, look both ways first. Always remain aware of your environment
and avoid unnecessary distractions. Always show due care and consideration for others.
Rule 5
Organised walks or parades involving large groups of people walking along a road should
use a pavement if available; if one is not available, they should keep to the left. Look-outs
should be positioned at the front and back of the group, and they should wear fluorescent
clothes in daylight and reflective clothes in the dark. At night, the look-out in front should
show a white light and the one at the back a red light. People on the outside of large groups
should also carry lights and wear reflective clothing.
Rule 8
At a junction. When you are crossing or waiting to cross the road, other traffic should give
way. Look out for traffic turning into the road, especially from behind you, and cross at a
place where drivers can see you. If you have started crossing and traffic wants to turn into
the road, you have priority and they should give way (see Rules H2 and 170).
Rule 13
Routes shared with cyclists. Cycle tracks may run alongside footpaths or pavements and be
separated from them by a feature such as a change of material, a verge, a kerb or a white
line. Such routes may also incorporate short lengths of tactile paving to help visually
impaired people stay on the correct side. On the pedestrian side this may comprise a series of
flat-topped bars running across the direction of travel (ladder pattern). On the cyclist side the
same bars are orientated in the direction of travel (tramline pattern).
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Some routes shared with cyclists will not be separated by such a feature allowing cyclists
and pedestrians to share the same space. Cyclists should respect your safety (see Rule 62)
but you should also take care not to obstruct or endanger them. Always remain aware of
your environment and avoid unnecessary distractions.
Where signs indicate, some routes are shared between pedestrians, cyclists, horse riders
and horse drawn vehicles. Cyclists, horse riders and drivers of horse drawn vehicles should
respect your safety, but you should take care not to obstruct or endanger them. Always
remain aware of your environment and avoid unnecessary distractions.
Rule 19
Zebra Crossing. Give traffic plenty of time to see you and to stop before you start to cross.
Vehicles will need more time when the road is slippery. Wait until traffic has stopped from
both directions or the road is clear before crossing. Remember that traffic does not have to
stop until someone has moved onto the crossing. Drivers and riders should give way to
pedestrians waiting to cross and MUST give way to pedestrians on a zebra crossing (see
Rule H2). Keep looking both ways, and listening, in case a driver or rider has not seen you
and attempts to overtake a vehicle that has stopped.
A zebra crossing with a central island is two separate crossings (see Rule 20)
Law TSRGD Schedule 14 part 5
Rules about animals
Riding
Rule 52
Before you take a horse or horse drawn vehicle on to the road you should
• ensure all tack fits well and is in good condition
• make sure you can control your horse
If you are an inexperienced horse rider or have not ridden for a while, consider taking the
Ride Safe Award from the British Horse Society. The Ride Safe Award provides a
foundation for any horse rider to be safe and knowledgeable when riding in all
environments but particularly on the road. For more information, see www.bhs.org.uk
Always ride with other, less nervous horses if you think that your horse will be nervous of
traffic. Never ride a horse without a saddle and bridle.
Rules for cyclists
Rule 59
Clothing. You should avoid clothes which may get tangled in the chain, or in a wheel or may
obscure your lights when you are cycling.
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Light-coloured or fluorescent clothing can help other road users to see you in daylight and
poor light, while reflective clothing and/or accessories (belt, arm or ankle bands) can
increase your visibility in the dark.

You should wear a cycle helmet which conforms to current regulations, is the correct size and
securely fastened. Evidence suggests that a correctly fitted helmet will reduce your risk of
sustaining a head injury in certain circumstances.
Rule 61
Cycle Routes and Other Facilities. Cycle lanes are marked by a white line (which may be
broken) along the carriageway (see Rule 140). Use facilities such as cycle lanes and tracks,
advanced stop lines and toucan crossings (see Rules 62 and 73) where they make your
journey safer and easier. This will depend on your experience and skills and the situation
at the time. While such facilities are provided for reasons of safety, cyclists may exercise
their judgement and are not obliged to use them.
Rule 62
Cycle Tracks. These are routes for cyclists that are physically protected or located away
from motor traffic, other than where they cross side roads (see Rule 206). Cycle tracks may
run alongside footpaths or pavements and be separated by a feature such as a change of
material, a verge, a kerb or a white line. You MUST keep to the side intended for cyclists as
the pedestrian side remains a pavement or footpath.
Some cycle tracks shared with pedestrians will not be separated by such a feature. On such
shared use routes, you should always take care when passing pedestrians, especially
children, older adults or disabled people, and allow them plenty of room. Always be prepared
to slow down and stop if necessary (see Rule H2).
Law HA 1835 sect 72
[New] Rule 63
Sharing space with pedestrians, horse riders and horse drawn vehicles. When riding in
places where sharing with pedestrians, horse riders or horse drawn vehicles is permitted,
take care when passing pedestrians and horse riders, especially children, older adults or
disabled people. Slow down when necessary and let them know you are there; for example,
by ringing your bell (it is recommended that a bell is fitted to your bike), or by calling out
politely.
Remember that pedestrians may be deaf, blind or partially sighted and that this may not be
obvious.
Do not pass pedestrians, horse riders or horse drawn vehicles closely or at high speed,
particularly from behind. You should not pass a horse on their left. Remember that horses
can be startled if passed without warning. Always be prepared to slow down and stop when
necessary.
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Rule 66
You should
• avoid any actions that could reduce your control of your cycle
• be considerate of the needs of other road users when riding in groups. You can
ride two abreast and it can be safer to do so, particularly in larger groups or when
accompanying children or less experienced riders. Be aware of drivers behind
you and allow them to overtake (for example, by moving into single file or
stopping) when you feel it is safe to let them do so
• not ride close behind another vehicle in case it stops suddenly
• not carry anything which will affect your balance or may get tangled up with your
wheels or chain
• be considerate of other road users, particularly blind and partially sighted
pedestrians, and horse riders (see Rule H1). Let them know you are there when
necessary, for example, by calling out or ringing your bell if you have one. It is
recommended that a bell be fitted.
Rule 67
You should:
• look all around to make sure it is safe before moving away from the kerb, when
pulling out to overtake or to pass stationary vehicles, or when turning at junctions
or stopping
• watch out for obstructions in the road, such as drains, service covers and potholes,
positioning yourself so you can move to the left (as well as to the right) to avoid
them safely
• take care when passing parked vehicles, leaving enough room (a door’s width or
1 metre) to avoid being hit if a car door is opened, and watch out for pedestrians
stepping into your path
• be aware of traffic coming up behind you, including other cyclists, and give a clear
signal to show other road users what you intend to do (see ‘Signals to other road
users’)
• take extra care near road humps, narrowings and other traffic calming features
• when cycling on the road, only pass to the left of large vehicles when they are
stationary or slow moving and you should proceed with caution as the driver may
not be able to see you. Be particularly careful on the approach to junctions or
where a large vehicle could change lanes to the left.
Rule 69
You MUST obey all traffic signs and traffic light signals.
Laws RTA 1988 sect 36 & TSRGD Schedule 3 pt 3, sch7 pt4, sch9 pts 4 and 6, sch 13 pt 6,
sch 14 pt 2
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Rule 71
At traffic light junctions and at cycle-only crossings with traffic lights, you MUST NOT
cross the stop line when the lights are red.
Some junctions have an advanced stop line to enable you to position yourself ahead of other
traffic and wait (see Rule 178). When the traffic lights are red, you may cross the first stop
line, but you MUST NOT cross the final stop line.
Laws RTA 1988 sect 36 & TSRGD Schedule 14 part 1
[New] Rule 72
Road positioning. When riding on the roads, there are two basic road positions you should
adopt, depending on the situation.

  1. Ride in the centre of your lane, to make yourself as clearly visible as possible, in the
    following situations:
    • on quiet roads or streets – if a faster vehicle comes up behind you, move to the left
    to enable them to overtake, if you can do so safely
    • in slower-moving traffic – when the traffic around you starts to flow more freely
    move over to the left if you can do so safely so that faster vehicles behind you can
    overtake
    • at the approach to junctions or road narrowings where it would be unsafe for
    drivers to overtake you
  2. When riding on busy roads, with vehicles moving faster than you, allow them to overtake
    where it is safe to do so whilst keeping at least 0.5 metres away, and further where it is
    safer, from the kerb edge. Remember that traffic on most dual carriageways moves quickly.
    Take extra care crossing slip roads.
    [New] Rule 73
    Junctions. Some junctions, particularly those with traffic lights, have special cycle
    facilities, including small cycle traffic lights at eye-level height, which may allow you to
    move or cross separately from or ahead of other traffic. Use these facilities where they
    make your journey safer and easier.
    At junctions with no separate cyclist facilities, it is recommended that you proceed as if you
    were driving a motor vehicle (see Rules 170 to 190). Position yourself in the centre of your
    chosen lane, where you feel able to do this safely, to make yourself as visible as possible
    and to avoid being overtaken where this would be dangerous. If you do not feel safe to
    proceed in this way, you may prefer to dismount and wheel your bike across the junction.
    [Rule 72 becomes] Rule 74
    Turning. When approaching a junction on the left, watch out for vehicles turning in front of
    you, out of or into the side road. If you intend to turn left, check first for other cyclists or
    9
    motorcyclists before signalling. Do not ride on the inside of vehicles signalling or slowing
    down to turn left.
    If you are turning right, check the traffic to ensure it is safe, then signal and move to the
    centre of the road. Wait until there is a safe gap in the oncoming traffic and give a final
    look before completing the turn. It may be safer to wait on the left until there is a safe gap
    or to dismount and push your cycle across the road.
    When turning into or out of a side road, you should give way to pedestrians crossing or
    waiting to cross (see Rule H2).
    [New] Rule 75
    Two Stage Turns. At some signal-controlled junctions there may be signs and markings
    informing cyclists to turn right in two stages:
    Stage 1: When the traffic lights turn green, cyclists wishing to make the turn should go
    straight ahead to the location marked by a cycle symbol and turn arrow on the
    carriageway; then stop and wait there
    Stage 2: When the traffic lights on the far side of the junction, now facing the cyclists, turn
    green, they should then complete the manoeuvre
    [New] Rule 76
    Going straight ahead. If you are going straight ahead at a junction, you have priority over
    traffic waiting to turn into or out of the side road, unless road signs or markings indicate
    otherwise (see Rule H3). Check that you can proceed safely, particularly when
    approaching junctions on the left alongside stationary or slow-moving traffic. Watch out
    for drivers intending to turn across your path. Remember the driver ahead may not be able
    to see you, so bear in mind your speed and position in the road.
    Take great care when deciding whether it is safe to pass stationary or slow-moving lorries
    and other long vehicles, especially at the approach to junctions, as their drivers may not be
    able to see you. Remember that they may have to move over to the right before turning left,
    and that their rear wheels may then come very close to the kerb while turning (see Rule
    67).
    [Rule 75 becomes] Rule 77
    Busy roads. When crossing faster or busy main roads, you may find it safer and easier to
    • dismount and push your cycle across
    • wait for a safe gap in the traffic before doing so, especially on faster roads and
    dual carriageways
    • make use of traffic islands or central reservations to help you where appropriate.
    [Rule 76 becomes] Rule 78
    Full details about the correct procedure at roundabouts without cycle facilities are contained
    in Rules 184 to 190.
    10
    Watch out for vehicles crossing your path to leave or join the roundabout, remembering
    that drivers may not easily see you.
    [Rule 77 becomes] Rule 79
    If you are turning right, you can ride in the left or right-hand lanes and move left when
    approaching your exit. Position yourself in the centre of your lane if it is safe to do so (see
    Rule 72) and signal right to indicate that you are not leaving the roundabout. Alternatively,
    you may feel safer walking your cycle round on the pavement or verge.
    If you decide to ride round keeping to the left-hand lane you should
    • be aware that drivers may not easily see you
    • take extra care when cycling across exits. You should signal right to show you are
    not leaving the roundabout
    • watch out for vehicles crossing your path to leave or join the roundabout.
    Where a roundabout has separate cycle facilities, you should use these facilities where they
    make your journey safer and easier although you are not obliged to use them. This will
    depend on your experience and skills and the situation at the time.
    [Rule 78 becomes] Rule 80
    Give plenty of room to long vehicles on the roundabout as they need more space to
    manoeuvre. Do not ride in the space they need to get round the roundabout. It may be safer to
    wait until they have cleared the roundabout.
    [Rule 79 becomes] Rule 81
    Do not ride across equestrian crossings, as they are for horse riders only. Do not ride across a
    pelican, puffin or zebra crossing. Dismount and wheel your cycle across.
    [Rule 80 becomes] Rule 82
    Crossings. Toucan crossings are light-controlled crossings which allow cyclists and
    pedestrians to share crossing space and cross at the same time. They are push-button
    operated. Pedestrians and cyclists will see the green signal together. Cyclists are permitted to
    ride across.
    Cycle tracks on opposite sides of the road may be linked by cycle-only signalled crossings.
    You may ride across but you MUST NOT cross until the green cycle symbol is showing.
    Cycle track crossings can be in spacious pedestrian environments. Cyclists should look out
    and be prepared to stop for pedestrians crossing the track informally as well as at these
    designated points.
    Take extra care when crossing level crossings and tramways (see Rule 306). You should
    dismount at level crossings where a ‘cyclist dismount’ sign is displayed.
    11
    Law TSRGD schedule 14 part 1
    General rules, techniques and advice for all drivers and riders
    Rule 125
    The speed limit is the absolute maximum and does not mean it is safe to drive at that speed
    irrespective of conditions. Unsafe speed increases the chances of causing a collision (or
    being unable to avoid one), as well as its severity. Inappropriate speeds are also
    intimidating, deterring people from walking, cycling or riding horses. Driving at speeds too
    fast for the road and traffic conditions is dangerous. You should always reduce your speed
    when
    • the road layout or condition presents hazards, such as bends
    • sharing the road with pedestrians, particularly children, older adults or disabled
    people, cyclists and horse riders, horse drawn vehicles and motorcyclists
    • weather conditions make it safer to do so
    • driving at night as it is more difficult to see other road users.
    Rule 140
    Cycle lanes and cycle tracks. Cycle lanes are shown by road markings and signs. You
    MUST NOT drive or park in a cycle lane marked by a solid white line during its times of
    operation. Do not drive or park in a cycle lane marked by a broken white line unless it is
    unavoidable. You MUST NOT park in any cycle lane whilst waiting restrictions apply.
    You should give way to any cyclists in a cycle lane, including when they are approaching
    from behind you – do not cut across them when you are turning or when you are changing
    lane (see Rule H3). Be prepared to stop and wait for a safe gap in the flow of cyclists before
    crossing the cycle lane.
    Cycle tracks are routes for cyclists that are physically protected or located away from motor
    traffic, other than where they cross side roads. Cycle tracks may be shared with
    pedestrians.
    You should give way to cyclists approaching or using the cycle track when you are turning
    into or out of a junction (see Rule H3). Be prepared to stop and wait for a safe gap in the
    flow of cyclists before crossing the cycle track, which may be used by cyclists travelling in
    both directions.
    Bear in mind that cyclists are not obliged to use cycle lanes or cycle tracks.
    Rule 144
    You MUST NOT
    • drive dangerously
    • drive without due care and attention
    12
    • drive without reasonable consideration for other road users.
    Driving requires focus and attention at all times. Remember, you may be driving
    dangerously or travelling too fast even if you don’t mean to.
    Law RTA 1988 sects 2 & 3 as amended by RTA 1991
    Rule 151
    In slow-moving traffic. You should
    • reduce the distance between you and the vehicle ahead to maintain traffic flow
    • never get so close to the vehicle in front that you cannot stop safely
    • leave enough space to be able to manoeuvre if the vehicle in front breaks down or an
    emergency vehicle needs to get past
    • not change lanes to the left to overtake
    • allow access into and from side roads
    • allow pedestrians and cyclists to cross in front of you
    • be aware of cyclists and motorcyclists who may be passing on either side.
    Using the road
    Rule 160
    Once moving you should
    • keep to the left, unless road signs or markings indicate otherwise. The exceptions are
    when you want to overtake, turn right or pass parked vehicles or pedestrians in the
    road
    • keep well to the left on right-hand bends. This will improve your view of the road and
    help avoid the risk of colliding with traffic approaching from the opposite direction
    • drive or ride with both hands on the wheel or handlebars where possible. This will
    help you to remain in full control of the vehicle at all times. You may use driver
    assistance systems while you are driving. Make sure you use any system according to
    the manufacturer’s instructions.
    • be aware of other road users, especially cycles and motorcycles who may be filtering
    through the traffic. These are more difficult to see than larger vehicles and their riders
    are particularly vulnerable. Give them plenty of room, especially if you are driving a
    long vehicle or towing a trailer. You should give way to cyclists when you are
    changing direction or lane – do not cut across them.
    • select a lower gear before you reach a long downhill slope. This will help to control
    your speed
    • when towing, remember the extra length will affect overtaking and manoeuvring. The
    extra weight will also affect the braking and acceleration.
    13
    Rule 163
    Overtake only when it is safe and legal to do so. You should
    • not get too close to the vehicle you intend to overtake
    • use your mirrors, signal when it is safe to do so, take a quick sideways glance if
    necessary into the blind spot area and then start to move out
    • not assume that you can simply follow a vehicle ahead which is overtaking; there may
    only be enough room for one vehicle
    • move quickly past the vehicle you are overtaking, once you have started to overtake.
    Allow plenty of room. Move back to the left as soon as you can but do not cut in
    • take extra care at night and in poor visibility when it is harder to judge speed and
    distance
    • give way to oncoming vehicles before passing parked vehicles or other obstructions
    on your side of the road
    • only overtake on the left if the vehicle in front is signalling to turn right, and there is
    room to do so
    • stay in your lane if traffic is moving slowly in queues. If the queue on your right is
    moving more slowly than you are, you may pass on the left. Cyclists may pass slower
    moving or stationary traffic on their right or left and should proceed with caution
    as the driver may not be able to see you. Be careful about doing so, particularly on
    the approach to junctions, and especially when deciding whether it is safe to pass
    lorries or other large vehicles.
    • give motorcyclists, cyclists, horse riders and horse drawn vehicles at least as much
    room as you would when overtaking a car (see Rules 211 to 215). As a guide:
    − leave at least 1.5 metres when overtaking cyclists at speeds of up to 30mph,
    and give them more space when overtaking at higher speeds
    − pass horse riders and horse-drawn vehicles at speeds under 10 mph and
    allow at least 2 metres space
    − allow at least 2 metres space and keep to a low speed when passing a
    pedestrian who is walking in the road (e.g. where there is no pavement)
    − take extra care and give more space when overtaking motorcyclists, cyclists,
    horse riders, horse drawn vehicles and pedestrians in bad weather
    (including high winds) and at night
    − you should wait behind the motorcyclist, cyclist, horse rider, horse drawn
    vehicle or pedestrian and not overtake if it is unsafe or not possible to meet
    these clearances
    Rule 167
    DO NOT overtake where you might come into conflict with other road users. For example
    • approaching or at a road junction on either side of the road
    14
    • where the road narrows
    • when approaching a school crossing patrol
    • on the approach to crossing facilities
    • where a vehicle ahead is slowing to stop for a pedestrian that is crossing from a
    pedestrian island (see Rule 165)
    • between the kerb and a bus or tram when it is at a stop
    • where traffic is queuing at junctions or road works
    • when you would force another road user to swerve or slow down
    • at a level crossing
    • when a road user is indicating right, even if you believe the signal should have been
    cancelled. Do not take a risk; wait for the signal to be cancelled
    • stay behind if you are following a cyclist approaching a roundabout or junction, and
    you intend to turn left. Do not cut across cyclists going ahead, including those using
    cycle lanes and cycle tracks (see Rule H3)
    • stay behind if you are following a horse rider or horse drawn vehicle approaching a
    roundabout or junction, and you intend to turn left. Do not cut across a horse rider
    or horse drawn vehicle going ahead.
    • when a tram is standing at a kerbside tram stop and there is no clearly marked passing
    lane for other traffic
    Rule 170
    Take extra care at junctions. You should
    • watch out for cyclists, motorcyclists and pedestrians including powered
    wheelchairs/mobility scooters users as they are not always easy to see. Be aware that
    they may not have seen or heard you if you are approaching from behind
    • give way to pedestrians crossing or waiting to cross a road into which or from which
    you are turning. If they have started to cross they have priority, so give way (see Rule
    H2)
    • remain behind cyclists, horse riders, horse drawn vehicles and motorcyclists at
    junctions even if they are waiting to turn and are positioned close to the kerb
    • watch out for long vehicles which may be turning at a junction ahead; they may have
    to use the whole width of the road to make the turn (see Rule 221)
    • watch out for horse riders who may take a different line on the road from that which
    you would expect
    • not assume, when waiting at a junction, that a vehicle coming from the right and
    signalling left will actually turn. Wait and make sure
    • look all around before emerging. Do not cross or join a road until there is a gap large
    enough for you to do so safely.
    15
    Rule 178
    Advanced stop lines. Some signal-controlled junctions have advanced stop lines to allow
    cyclists to be positioned ahead of other traffic. Motorists, including motorcyclists, MUST
    stop at the first white line reached if the lights are amber or red and should avoid blocking the
    way or encroaching on the marked area at other times, e.g. if the junction ahead is blocked. If
    your vehicle has proceeded over the first white line at the time that the signal goes red, you
    should stop as soon as possible and MUST stop at the second white line. Allow cyclists,
    including any moving or waiting alongside you, enough time and space to move off when
    the green signal shows.
    Drivers of large vehicles should stop sufficiently far behind the first white line so that they
    can see the whole area where cyclists may be waiting, allowing for any blind spot in front
    of the vehicle.
    Laws RTA 1988 sect 36 & TSRGD Schedule 14 part 1
    Rule 183
    When turning
    • keep as close to the left as is safe and practicable
    • give way to any vehicles using a bus lane, cycle lane, cycle track or tramway from
    either direction, including when they are passing slow moving or stationary vehicles
    on either side.
    Rule 186
    Signals and position. When taking the first exit to the left, unless signs or markings indicate
    otherwise
    • signal left and approach in the left-hand lane
    • keep to the left on the roundabout and continue signalling left to leave.
    • When taking an exit to the right or going full circle, unless signs or markings indicate
    otherwise
    • signal right and approach in the right-hand lane
    • keep to the right on the roundabout until you need to change lanes to exit the
    roundabout
    • signal left after you have passed the exit before the one you want.
    • When taking any intermediate exit, unless signs or markings indicate otherwise
    • select the appropriate lane on approach to the roundabout
    • you should not normally need to signal on approach
    • stay in this lane until you need to alter course to exit the roundabout
    16
    • signal left after you have passed the exit before the one you want.
    When there are more than three lanes at the entrance to a roundabout, use the most
    appropriate lane on approach and through it.
    You should give priority to cyclists on the roundabout. They will be travelling more slowly
    than motorised traffic. Give them plenty of room and do not attempt to overtake them
    within their lane. Allow them to move across your path as they travel around the
    roundabout.
    Cyclists, horse riders and horse drawn vehicles may stay in the left-hand lane when they
    intend to continue across or around the roundabout and should signal right to show you
    they are not leaving the roundabout. Drivers should take extra care when entering a
    roundabout to ensure that they do not cut across cyclists, horse riders or horse drawn
    vehicles in the left-hand lane, who are continuing around the roundabout.
    Rule 187
    In all cases watch out for and give plenty of room to
    • pedestrians who may be crossing the approach and exit roads
    • traffic crossing in front of you on the roundabout, especially vehicles intending to
    leave by the next exit
    • traffic which may be straddling lanes or positioned incorrectly
    • motorcyclists
    • long vehicles (including those towing trailers). These might have to take a different
    course or straddle lanes either approaching or on the roundabout because of their
    length. Watch out for their signals
    Rule 192
    In slow-moving and queuing traffic you should keep crossings completely clear, as blocking
    these makes it difficult and dangerous for pedestrians to cross. You should not enter a
    pedestrian crossing if you are unable to completely clear the crossing. Nor should you
    block advanced stop lines for cycles.
    Rule 195
    Zebra and parallel crossings. As you approach a zebra crossing
    • look out for pedestrians waiting to cross and be ready to slow down or stop
    • you should give way to pedestrians waiting to cross
    • you MUST give way when a pedestrian has moved onto a crossing
    • allow more time for stopping on wet or icy roads
    • do not wave, flash your lights or use your horn to invite pedestrians across; this could
    be dangerous if another vehicle is approaching
    17
    • be patient, do not sound your horn or rev your engine as this can be intimidating
    • be aware of pedestrians approaching from the side of the crossing.
    A zebra crossing with a central island is two separate crossings (see ‘Crossings’).
    Parallel crossings are similar to zebra crossings, but include a cycle route alongside the
    black and white stripes.
    As you approach a parallel crossing
    • look out for pedestrians or cyclists waiting to cross and slow down or stop
    • you should give way to pedestrians or cyclists waiting to cross
    • you MUST give way when a pedestrian or cyclist has moved onto a crossing
    • allow more time for stopping on wet or icy roads
    • do not wave, flash your lights or use your horn to invite pedestrians or cyclists
    across; this could be dangerous if another vehicle is approaching
    • be patient, do not sound your horn or rev your engine as this can be intimidating
    • be aware of pedestrians or cyclists approaching from the side of the crossing.
    A parallel crossing with a central island is two separate crossings (see Rules 19 and 20).
    Law TSRGD schedule 14 Part 5
    Rule 199
    Toucan, puffin and equestrian crossings. These are similar to pelican crossings, but there is
    no flashing amber phase; the light sequence for traffic at these three crossings is the same as
    at traffic lights. If the signal-controlled crossing is not working, proceed with extreme
    caution. Do not enter the crossing if you are unable to completely clear it, to avoid
    obstructing pedestrians, cyclists or horse riders.
    Road users requiring extra care
    Rule 204
    The road users most at risk from road traffic are pedestrians, in particular children, older
    adults and disabled people, cyclists, horse riders and motorcyclists. It is particularly
    important to be aware of children, older adults and disabled people, and learner and
    inexperienced drivers and riders. In any interaction between road users, those who can
    cause the greatest harm have the greatest responsibility to reduce the danger or threat they
    pose to others.
    Rule 206
    Drive carefully and slowly when
    18
    • in crowded shopping streets, Home Zones and Quiet Lanes (see Rule 218) or
    residential areas
    • driving past bus and tram stops; pedestrians may emerge suddenly into the road
    • passing parked vehicles, especially ice cream vans; children are more interested in ice
    cream than traffic and may run into the road unexpectedly
    • needing to cross a pavement, cycle lane or cycle track; for example, to reach or leave
    a driveway or private access. Give way to pedestrians on the pavement and cyclists
    using a cycle lane or cycle track
    • reversing into a side road; look all around the vehicle and give way to any pedestrians
    who may be crossing the road
    • turning at road junctions; you should give way to pedestrians who are crossing or
    waiting to cross the road into which or from which you are turning
    • going through road works or when passing roadside rescue and recovery vehicles,
    as there may be people working in or at the side of the road
    • the pavement is closed due to street repairs and pedestrians are directed to use the
    road
    • approaching pedestrians on narrow rural roads without a footway or footpath. Always
    slow down and be prepared to stop if necessary, giving them plenty of room as you
    drive past
    • approaching zebra and parallel crossings as you MUST give way to pedestrians and
    cyclists on the crossing (see Rule 195)
    • approaching pedestrians who have started to cross the road ahead of you. They
    have priority so you should give way (see Rule H2).
    Law TSRGD schedule 14 Part 5
    Rule 211
    It is often difficult to see motorcyclists and cyclists, especially when they are waiting
    alongside you, coming up from behind, coming out of or moving off from junctions, at
    roundabouts, overtaking you or filtering through traffic. Always look out for them before you
    emerge from a junction; they could be approaching faster than you think.
    Do not turn at a junction if to do so would cause the cyclist going straight ahead to stop or
    swerve, just as you would do with a motor vehicle.

When turning right across a line of slow-moving or stationary traffic, look out for and give
way to cyclists or motorcyclists on the inside of the traffic you are crossing. Be especially
careful when moving off, turning, and when changing direction or lane. Be sure to check
mirrors and blind spots carefully.
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Rule 212
Give motorcyclists, cyclists, horse riders, horse drawn vehicles and pedestrians walking in
the road (for example, where there is no pavement), at least as much room as you would
when overtaking a car (see Rules 162 to 167). Drivers should take extra care and give more
space when overtaking motorcyclists, cyclists, horse riders, horse drawn vehicles and
pedestrians in bad weather (including high winds) and at night. If the rider looks over their
shoulder it could mean that they intend to pull out, turn right or change direction. Give them
time and space to do so.
Rule 213
On narrow sections of road, on quiet roads or streets, at road junctions and in slowermoving traffic, cyclists may sometimes ride in the centre of the lane, rather than towards
the side of the road. It can be safer for groups of cyclists to ride two abreast in these
situations. Allow them to do so for their own safety, to ensure they can see and be seen.
Cyclists are also advised to ride at least a door’s width or 1 metre from parked cars for
their own safety.
On narrow sections of road, horse riders may ride in the centre of the lane. Allow them to
do so for their own safety to ensure they can see and be seen.
Motorcyclists, cyclists, horse riders and horse drawn vehicles may suddenly need to avoid
uneven road surfaces and obstacles such as drain covers or oily, wet or icy patches on the
road. Give them plenty of room and pay particular attention to any sudden change of
direction they may have to make.
Rule 215
Horse riders and horse-drawn vehicles. Be particularly careful of horse riders and horsedrawn vehicles especially when approaching, overtaking, passing or moving away. Always
pass wide and slowly. When you see a horse on a road, you should slow down to a
maximum of 10 mph. Be patient, do not sound your horn or rev your engine. When safe to
do so, pass wide and slow, allowing at least 2 metres of space.
Feral or semi feral ponies found in areas such as the New Forest, Exmoor and Dartmoor
require the same consideration as ridden horses when approaching or passing.
Horse riders are often children, so take extra care and remember riders may ride in double file
when escorting a young or inexperienced horse or rider. Look out for horse riders’ and horse
drivers’ signals and heed a request to slow down or stop. Take great care and treat all horses
as a potential hazard; they can be unpredictable despite the efforts of their rider/driver.
Remember there are three brains at work when you pass a horse; the rider’s, the driver’s
and the horse’s. Don’t forget horses are flight animals and can move incredibly quickly if
startled.
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Rule 239
Use off-street parking areas, or bays marked out with white lines on the road as parking
places, wherever possible. If you have to stop on the roadside:
• do not park facing against the traffic flow
• stop as close as you can to the side
• do not stop too close to a vehicle displaying a Blue Badge: remember, the occupant
may need more room to get in or out
• you MUST switch off the engine, headlights and fog lights
• you MUST apply the handbrake before leaving the vehicle
• you MUST ensure you do not hit anyone when you open your door. Check for
cyclists or other traffic by looking all around and using your mirrors
• where you are able to do so, you should open the door using your hand on the
opposite side to the door you are opening; for example, use your left hand to open a
door on your right-hand side. This will make you turn your head to look over your
shoulder. You are then more likely to avoid causing injury to cyclists or
motorcyclists passing you on the road, or to people on the pavement
• it is safer for your passengers (especially children) to get out of the vehicle on the side
next to the kerb
• put all valuables out of sight and make sure your vehicle is secure
• lock your vehicle.
Before using a hand-held device to help you to park, you MUST make sure it is safe to do so.
Then, you should move the vehicle into the parking space in the safest way, and by the
shortest route possible.
When you use a hand-held device to help you to park, you MUST remain in control of the
vehicle at all times. Do not use the hand-held device for anything else while you are using it
to help you park, and do not put anyone in danger. Use the hand-held device according to the
manufacturer’s instructions.
When using an electric vehicle charge point, you should park close to the charge point and
avoid creating a trip hazard for pedestrians from trailing cables. Display a warning sign if
you can. After using the charge point, you should return charging cables and connectors
neatly to minimise the danger to pedestrians and avoid creating an obstacle for other road
users.
Laws CUR regs 98, 105, 107 & 110, RVLR reg 27 & RTA 1988 sect 42
Annex 1. You and your bicycle
Make sure that you feel confident of your ability to ride safely on the road. Be sure that
• you have the right size and type of cycle for your comfort and safety
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• the lights and reflectors are clean and in good working order
• the tyres are in good condition and inflated to the pressure shown on the tyre
• the wheels spin freely
• the gears are working correctly
• the chain is properly adjusted and oiled
• the saddle and handlebars are adjusted to the correct height.
You should fit a bell to your cycle.
You MUST
• ensure your brakes are efficient
• have white front and red rear lights lit when cycling at night.
Laws PCUR regs 6 & 10 & RVLR reg 18
Cycle training: If you are an inexperienced cyclist or have not ridden for a while, consider
taking a cycle training course. Some councils offer national standard cycle training such
as Bikeability and in certain areas this is free of charge. It can help build up your skills
and confidence.
There are three levels to Bikeability, starting with the basics of balancing, stopping and
starting safely, through to handling complex and busy junctions. You will also learn about
traffic signs and the rules of the road, planning routes, safe road positioning and
signalling (particularly at junctions) and basic cycle maintenance. For more information,
see www.bikeability.org.uk,www.cycling.scot/bikeability-scotland,
www.bikeabilitywales.org.uk/
Annex 6. Vehicle maintenance, safety and security
Vehicle maintenance
Take special care that lights, brakes, steering, exhaust system, seat belts, demisters, wipers,
washers and any audible warning systems are all working. Also
• lights, indicators, reflectors, and number plates MUST be kept clean and clear
• windscreens and windows MUST be kept clean and free from obstructions to vision
• lights MUST be properly adjusted to prevent dazzling other road users.
• Extra attention needs to be paid to this if the vehicle is heavily loaded
• exhaust emissions MUST NOT exceed prescribed levels
• ensure your seat, seat belt, head restraint and mirrors are adjusted correctly before you
drive
• ensure that items of luggage are securely stowed.
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Laws RVLR 1989 regs 23 & 27, & CUR regs 30 & 61
Warning displays. Make sure that you understand the meaning of all warning displays on
the vehicle instrument panel. Do not ignore warning signs, they could indicate a dangerous
fault developing.
• When you turn the ignition key, warning lights will be illuminated but will go out
when the engine starts (except the handbrake warning light). If they do not, or if they
come on while you are driving, stop and investigate the problem, as you could have a
serious fault.
• If the charge warning light comes on while you are driving, it may mean that the
battery isn’t charging. This should also be checked as soon as possible to avoid loss of
power to lights and other electrical systems.
Window tints. You MUST NOT use a vehicle with excessively dark tinting applied to the
windscreen, or to the glass in any front window to either side of the driver. Window tinting
applied during manufacture complies with the Visual Light Transmittance (VLT) standards.
There are no VLT limits for rear windscreens or rear passenger windows.
Laws RTA 1988 sect 42 & CUR reg 32
Tyres. Tyres MUST be correctly inflated to the vehicle manufacturer’s specification for the
load being carried. Always refer to the vehicle’s handbook or data. Tyres should also be free
from certain cuts and other defects.
Cars, light vans and light trailers MUST have a tread depth of at least 1.6 mm across the
central three-quarters of the breadth of the tread and around the entire circumference.
Motorcycles, large vehicles and passenger-carrying vehicles MUST have a tread depth of at
least 1 mm across three-quarters of the breadth of the tread and in a continuous band around
the entire circumference.
Mopeds should have visible tread.
Be aware that some vehicle defects can attract penalty points.
Law CUR reg 27
If a tyre bursts while you are driving, try to keep control of your vehicle. Grip the steering
wheel firmly and allow the vehicle to roll to a stop at the side of the road.
If you have a flat tyre, stop as soon as it is safe to do so. Only change the tyre if you can do so
without putting yourself or others at risk – otherwise call a breakdown service.
Tyre pressures. Check weekly. Do this before your journey, when tyres are cold. Warm or
hot tyres may give a misleading reading.
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Your brakes and steering will be adversely affected by under-inflated or over-inflated tyres.
Excessive or uneven tyre wear may be caused by faults in the braking or suspension systems,
or wheels which are out of alignment. Have these faults corrected as soon as possible.
Fluid levels. Check the fluid levels in your vehicle at least weekly. Low brake fluid may
result in brake failure and a crash. Make sure you recognise the low fluid warning lights if
your vehicle has them fitted.
Before winter. Ensure that the battery is well maintained and that there are appropriate antifreeze agents in your radiator and windscreen bottle.
Other problems. If your vehicle
• pulls to one side when braking, it is most likely to be a brake fault or incorrectly
inflated tyres. Consult a garage or mechanic immediately
• continues to bounce after pushing down on the front or rear, its shock absorbers are
worn. Worn shock absorbers can seriously affect the operation of a vehicle and should
be replaced
• smells of anything unusual such as burning rubber, petrol or an electrical fault;
investigate immediately. Do not risk a fire.
Overheated engines or fire. Most engines are water-cooled. If your engine overheats you
should wait until it has cooled naturally. Only then remove the coolant filler cap and add
water or other coolant.
If your vehicle catches fire, get the occupants out of the vehicle quickly and to a safe place.
Do not attempt to extinguish a fire in the engine compartment, as opening the bonnet will
make the fire flare. Call the fire brigade.
Petrol stations/fuel tank/fuel leaks. Ensure that, when filling up your vehicle’s tank or any
fuel cans you are carrying, you do not spill fuel on the forecourt. Any spilled fuel should be
immediately reported to the petrol station attendant. Diesel spillage is dangerous to other road
users, particularly motorcyclists, as it will significantly reduce the level of grip between the
tyres and road surface. Double-check for fuel leaks and make sure that
• you do not overfill your fuel tank
• the fuel cap is fastened securely
• the seal in the cap is not torn, perished or missing
• there is no visual damage to the cap or the fuel tank
Emergency fuel caps, if fitted, should form a good seal.
Never smoke, or use a mobile phone, on the forecourt of petrol stations as these are major fire
risks and could cause an explosion.
Undertake all aspects of the daily walkaround checks for commercial vehicles as
recommended by the DVSA and the Fleet Operator Recognition Scheme
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(https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/van-drivers-daily-walkaround-check/vandrivers-daily-walkaround-check